How long do you think it will be until chain saws have four strokes?

Discussion in 'Chain Saw Forum' started by NUTNDUN, Dec 19, 2010.

  1. NUTNDUN

    NUTNDUN Administrator

    Do you think chain saws will end up coming with four strokes before the epa outlaws two strokes? Or do you think that on certain equipment that two strokes will always be allowed? They have made good headway on cutting down emissions on the current chain saw offerings with the use of strato technology.
     
  2. mjodrey

    mjodrey Moderator

    You know,the way things are going,it might not be that long.
     
  3. Bolens 1000

    Bolens 1000 Member

    I sadly agree :(
     
  4. caseguy

    caseguy Member

    Mama said "If you don't have anything nice to say, don't say anything at all!"...and I don't have anything nice to say about the EPA so...
     
  5. mjodrey

    mjodrey Moderator

    It never stopped you before.LOL :D
     
  6. caseguy

    caseguy Member

    Ouch!...You're right though LOL!
     
  7. mjodrey

    mjodrey Moderator

    Steve ,don't take it to heart,I WAS ONLY KIDDING.:D
     
  8. NUTNDUN

    NUTNDUN Administrator

    That's not what you told me on chat! <insert evil laugh here> :D
     
  9. mjodrey

    mjodrey Moderator


    Hey ,you weren't supposed to tell.LOL:D
     
  10. bhts

    bhts Member

    I though i read somewhere that a 4 stoke chainsaw was already being made.
     
  11. MH81

    MH81 Member

    ROFL
     
  12. NUTNDUN

    NUTNDUN Administrator

    It wouldn't surprise me if a four stroke chain saw was already being made or at least being tested. With the way the EPA is they will have such high emissions standards for outdoor power equipment that it will get to the point no matter what technology they put in to two strokes, the two strokes won't meet the emissions standards. I hate to say it but I think that will be the end result.
     
  13. mike meuser

    mike meuser New Member

    Personally I can't wait until 4 strokes are available. Stihl already has 2 - 4 stroke hybrids that work very well. I contacted them and they are working on incorporating the technology into the chainsaws. Dolmar had a prototype in 2006 and now they have other 4 stroke powered equipment so I don't think it will be long before we see 4 strokes from both of these vendors. I want 4 stroke because they're quieter, produce more and flatter torque at lower rpm, potentially easier to start. Honda mini motors have shown that small 4 strokes can be powerful, relatively light and reliable. I'll be first in line for a 4 stroke chainsaw.
     
  14. mike meuser

    mike meuser New Member

    husky bought redmax so that they could incorporate their cleaner technology into husky and poulan saws. Others are struggling with making 2 strokes clean enough. Stories of seizing because of lean running, problems with catalytics.... modern small 4 strokes will alleviate all this and we'll end up with some really nice easy to start, torquey chainsaws that will work well.
     
  15. NUTNDUN

    NUTNDUN Administrator

    Welcome to OPT Mike.

    I like 4 strokes especially in small engines, the only thing I am curious on is how they do with weight and longevity due to trying to keep the weight down.
     
  16. mike meuser

    mike meuser New Member

    Thanks George - Dolmar's prototype came out in 2006 or so and now they have 4 stroke power in much of their equipment - same with Stihl. I figure and hope that by the time they get to chainsaws, they'll have the weight and longevity worked out. I was using my little mac 110 today. 30 years old and still strong. Looking at it I realized that it's about 2 pounds heavier than a comparable modern saw of its size and power and a lot of that is because it is high quality, uses metal rather than plastic, has a 2 ring piston... I don't really notice the extra weight and doubt if I will with a 4 stroke chainsaw. Dolmar claims they get 25% more useable power out of a 4 stroke vs a 2 stroke. So comparing power to power rather than cc to cc, you might end up with about the same weight for the same power. I'm hopeful that they'll both come up with some really nice, light, torquey chainsaws for us soon - Mike
     
  17. NUTNDUN

    NUTNDUN Administrator

    I know the use of magnesium for engine cylinders and blocks has helped cut some weight. The newer saws do use a lot of plastic, on some though I don't see it as a bad thing if it is done right. I really like Dolmar saws and plan to get a larger one then my Stihl 362.

    If they are able to get more power out of the same cc which is definitely believable it will definitely help with keeping the weight down in the different saw classes. Where a 40cc four stroke would be marketed the same class as a 50 - 55 cc two stroke.

    The only downside that I can think of would be the $ per cc figures. Not saying it will be a bad thing as there will be more engineering and more moving parts in a four stroke. I am excited though to get to experience using a four stroke saw so hopefully it doesn't take too long until we get to see some on the market.
     
  18. caseguy

    caseguy Member

    The Redmax's may be cleaner, but they're the most cantankerous and temperamental saws I've ever seen! My FIL has 3 he uses for carving and they're down & out more than they're up & running!
     

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